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Posts for: August, 2020

DakotaJohnsonandHerMissingToothGapSparksOnlineDebate

Celebrities’ controversial actions and opinions frequently spark fiery debates on social media. But actress Dakota Johnson lit a match to online platforms in a seemingly innocent way—through orthodontics.

This summer she appeared at the premier of her film The Peanut Butter Falcon missing the trademark gap between her front teeth. Interestingly, it happened a little differently than you might think: Her orthodontist removed a permanent retainer attached to the back of her teeth, and the gap closed on its own.

Tooth gaps are otherwise routinely closed with braces or other forms of orthodontics. But, as the back and forth that ensued over Johnson’s new look shows, a number of people don’t think that’s a good idea: It’s not just a gap—it’s your gap, a part of your own uniqueness.

Someone who might be sympathetic to that viewpoint is Michael Strahan, a host on Good Morning America. Right after the former football star began his NFL career, he strongly considered closing the noticeable gap between his two front teeth. In the end, though, he opted to keep it, deciding it was a defining part of his appearance.

But consider another point of view: If it truly is your gap (or whatever other quirky smile “defect” you may have), you can do whatever you want with it—it really is your choice. And, on that score, you have options.

You can have a significant gap closed with orthodontics or, if it’s only a slight gap or other defect, you can improve your appearance with the help of porcelain veneers or crowns. You can also preserve a perceived flaw even while undergoing cosmetic enhancements or restorations. Implant-supported replacement teeth, for example, can be fashioned to retain unique features of your former smile like a tooth gap.

If you’re considering a “smile makeover,” we’ll blend your expectations and desires into the design plans for your future smile. In the case of something unique like a tooth gap, we’ll work closely with dental technicians to create restorations that either include or exclude the gap or other characteristics as you wish.

Regardless of the debate raging on social media, the final arbiter of what a smile should look like is the person wearing it. Our goal is to make sure your new smile reflects the real you.

If you would like more information about cosmetically enhancing your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Space Between Front Teeth” and “The Impact of a Smile Makeover.”


By Montgomery Dental Care
August 20, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tmj disorders   TMJ  

Your TMJ or temporomandibular joint serves as a sliding hinge that connects the jawbone to the skull. Like every other part of the body, the TMJ could also get damaged and result in conditions known as TMJDs or TMJ disorders. These could result in discomfort and pain in the jaw joint as well as the muscles used for controlling jaw movements.

If you suspect that you have a TMJ disorder, you can consult with Dr. Janette Williams here at Montgomery Dental Care in Cincinnati, OH, for an accurate diagnosis and proper TMJ treatment.

Possible Causes and Symptoms of TMJ Disorders

The specific cause of TMJ disorders is typically hard to pinpoint. The pain might be a result of various combinations like jaw injury, arthritis, or genetics. Some individuals who experience jaw pain likewise tend to grind or clench their teeth, a condition known as bruxism. However, lots of individuals who habitually grind or clench their teeth don’t develop TMJDs.

Put simply, the cause of many TMJ conditions isn’t clear. However, painful cases of TMJ disorders typically occur when:

  • The TMJ sustains damage due to a blow or some kind of impact
  • The cartilage of the TMJ gets damaged due to arthritis
  • The disk moves out of alignment or erodes

You may have a TMJ disorder if you’re experiencing:

  • Tenderness or pain in your jaw
  • Pain in just one of both of your TMJs
  • Aching pain around and in your ear
  • Aching facial pain
  • Pain and/or difficulty when chewing
  • Lockjaw or when the jaw locks, which makes it hard to close or open the mouth
  • A grating sensation or clicking sound when chewing or opening your mouth

Visit your dentist in Montgomery, OH, for TMJ treatment if the tenderness or pain in your jaw persists, or if you aren’t able to completely close or open your jaw.

Treatment Options for TMJ Disorders

In lots of cases, the discomfort and pain related to TMJ disorders are fleeting and could be alleviated with nonsurgical remedies and home self-care techniques. But if these conservative treatments fail to work, your doctor might recommend a combination of more potent treatment options. These can include:

  • Medications for pain and inflammation, or muscle relaxants
  • Non-drug therapies such as mouth guards or oral splints
  • Physical therapy
  • Counseling to combat bruxism and other negative habits that contribute to TMJDs such as nail-biting

If You Have Concerns or Questions About TMJ, We Can Help

Dial (513) 793-5703 to schedule a consultation with Dr. Janette Williams of Montgomery Dental Care in Cincinnati, OH, for proper TMJ treatment.


LingualBracesMightbeaBetterFitforYourActiveLifestyle

If you've decided to straighten your teeth, you've made a wise choice for both your dental health and your smile. Now you may be facing another decision—which method to use for bite correction.

Not too long ago people had only one choice—traditional braces all the way. But that changed with the introduction of clear aligners, a series of removable plastic trays worn one after the other to realign teeth. In all but a few situations, clear aligners accomplish the same outcome as braces but without the conspicuous appearance and, thanks to their removability, difficulty in brushing and flossing teeth.

And now, a recent innovation in orthodontics could give you a third option—lingual braces. These are braces fixed to the back of teeth adjacent to the tongue (hence the term “lingual”), rather than on the front as with traditional braces. They essentially perform the same action, only instead of “pushing” teeth like traditional braces, they “pull” the teeth to the target positions. Lingual braces may also ease certain disadvantages people find with traditional braces or clear aligners.

If you're into martial arts, for instance, you may encounter blows to the face that increase your injury risk while wearing traditional braces. Likewise, if you're highly social, clear aligners can be a hassle to take out and keep up with if you're frequently eating in public. Lingual braces answer both types of issues: They won't damage your lips or gums in the case of blunt force facial contact; and they remain out of sight, out of mind in social situations.

Before considering lingual braces, though, keep in mind that they may cost 15-35 percent more than traditional braces. They also take time for some people to get used to because of how they feel to the tongue. And, they're not yet as widely available as traditional braces, although the number of orthodontists who have received training in the new method is increasing.

If you'd like to know more about lingual braces and whether they're right for you, speak to your dentist or orthodontist. You may find that this new option for improving your dental health and your smile fits your lifestyle.

If you would like more information on lingual braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Lingual Braces: A Truly Invisible Way to Straighten Teeth.”


By Montgomery Dental Care
August 01, 2020
Category: Oral Health
NewStudiesShowSealantsCouldHelpYourChildAvoidToothDecay

Your child could hit a speed bump on their road to dental maturity—tooth decay. In fact, children are susceptible to an aggressive form of decay known as Early Childhood Caries (ECC) that can lead to tooth loss and possible bite issues for other teeth.

But dentists have a few weapons in their arsenal for helping children avoid tooth decay. One of these used for many years now is the application of sealants to the biting surfaces of both primary and permanent teeth. Now, two major research studies have produced evidence that sealant applications help reduce children's tooth decay.

Applying sealant is a quick and painless procedure that doesn't require drilling or anesthesia. A dentist brushes the sealant in liquid form to the nooks and crannies of a tooth's biting surfaces, which tend to accumulate decay-causing bacterial plaque. They then use a curing light to harden the sealant.

The studies previously mentioned that involved thousands of patients over a number of years, found that pediatric patients without dental sealants were more than three times likely to get cavities compared to those who had sealants applied to their teeth. The studies also found the beneficial effect of a sealant could last four years or more after its application.

The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend sealants for children, especially those at high risk for decay. It's common practice now for children to first get sealants when their first permanent molars erupt (teeth that are highly susceptible to decay), usually between the ages of 5 and 7, and then later as additional molars come in.

There is a modest cost for sealant applications, but far less than the potential costs for decay treatment and later bite issues. Having your child undergo sealant treatment is a worthwhile investment: It could prevent decay and tooth loss in the near-term, and also help your child avoid more extensive dental problems in the future.

If you would like more information on sealants and other preventive measures for children's teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.